4 reasons Fiverr pro gig strugles for sales

4 Reasons Some Fiverr Pro Gigs Have Struggled to Make Sales

Not too long ago, Fiverr launched ‘Fiver pro‘. An opportunity for the best freelancers on the platform to standout from the crowd. Without an iota of doubt, a freelancer with a fiverr pro gig will earn with one order what a regular freelancer earns by completing 10-20 orders. Well, according to the pricing most pro sellers set on their gigs.

But the question now is: will a Fiverr pro seller make one sale before a regular freelancer makes 20 sales?

In order to become a highly successful freelancer, you need to make all the right choices. Choosing to become a pro seller is supposed to be one of them.

Once you get approved for Fiverr pro, you get a badge that distinguishes your pro gig from regular gigs.

Freelancers with Fiverr pro gigs enjoy a lot of benefits. Coupled with the fact that they can set a higher gig pricing, they also get featured on the Fiverr affiliate program – an opportunity to further boost their sales.

Fiverr pro is new and a lot of things are still being put into place.

Since its launch, I quite developed an interest in how things would unfold, and have been keeping track of how pro sellers have performed, based on: gig orders, sales, and reviews.

In my opinion, most regular high ranking fiverr gigs will continue making by far more sales than most freelancers with pro gigs and I’ll explain why.

Reasons some Fiverr pro gigs have struggled

1. People will always love cheap or free

The Fiverr pro badge is an endorsement from Fiverr. When buyers see that badge, even with a very high price tag, aren’t they supposed to queue up for your service?

Nay, they won’t!

And the reason is simple… “people will always love cheap or free.”

99.9% of buyers visit Fiverr because they love the $5 services they get from freelancers. That mentality hasn’t changed a bit. So, even with pro gigs displayed, they will always find the cheap ones more appealing.

That’s the whole concept of Fiverr in the first place. The $5 platform.

2. Most buyers already have their favorite sellers

When most buyers visit Fiverr, they search for those particular freelancers they’ve been doing business with for a long time – freelancers that delivered quality services to them and have proved their qualities time and time again.

Put yourself in the buyers’ shoes…

When you have a freelancer you’ve been doing business with for many years and have never had a reason to complain about any delivery, do you then need to see a pro badge to know that freelancer is a pro?

certainly not!

3. Even regular sellers deliver quality jobs

This point, in a way, aligns with the second point. Many sellers on Fiverr have not applied and don’t plan on applying for a Fiverr pro gig, simply because they are doing very fine with their regular gigs and are already making a lot of sales with it.

Too many people on freelance platforms are more than willing to offer ridiculously cheap gig pricing in a bid to cope with the competition from rivals.

So, they are more than satisfied with where they are and may never apply for a Fiverr pro account. This creates a huge challenge for pro sellers.

And like I said earlier, even without a pro badge, a lot of buyers already know some regular freelancers that can be regarded as

‘pro sellers’ and are happy to always work with them.

4. A lot of Fiverr pro gigs set very high pricing

When I searched for Fiverr pro logo designers, I noticed that some pro gigs set a pricing of $2000, while some other set a pricing of $100. And as expected, the pro sellers with lower gig pricing have continued to amass more sales than the ones with very high pricing.

Many freelancers have struggled to make sales with their pro gigs because of the high pricing they set. Don’t get me wrong, you deserve every penny you set.

But you may find it difficult to make sales because a vast majority of other quality freelancers prefer to set a lower gig pricing than yours.

There’s no equilibrium in the freelancing setup — so many things are wrong and have to be looked into.

In the outside world, there are Labor Unions that fight for the right of workers — help them get the best possible treatment from Government agencies, private firms, or whichever organization they work with.

However, freelance platforms have complete control over home-based jobs. There are no agencies in place to fight for the rights of freelancers. Something like “Freelancers’ Labor Union”.

In recent years, we’ve seen so many information collection laws emerge. The recent and most notable one is the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation). Website owners have had to run helter-skelter to make their websites GDPR compliant.

Freelance platforms command millions of workforce worldwide, and the number keeps increasing. But sadly, no one cares about setting up laws to help this ever increasing internet workforce.

If there could be a law so strong to shake the whole of the web (even Google). Why can’t there be a law to help improve freelancers’ well-being — a law that compels freelance platform to set a minimum pricing for professional jobs.

Those are all my personal opinions. Don’t expect to see a change anytime soon.

So, for now, freelance platforms remain ‘survival of the cheapest’.

So to make more sales with your pro gig, you may have to bring down your gig pricing to match what other Fiverr pro gigs offer.

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